Friday, November 22, 2013

Homework for the Weekend - 11/22/2013

Honors English II

Over the weekend I'd like for you to do a few things related to the first four sections of Persepolis.  First, you should go back through and make sure that your notes are in good shape.  Remember that you're supposed to be focusing on the main characters in the family as well as key moments which lead to development in the characters.  Second, I'd like for you to respond to the following prompt in a solid paragraph.  You can use the comments to do your paragraph (which I prefer because we can then see what we think) or you can submit your response on paper.  No matter which route you choose, be sure that you use clear references to the text in order to clarify, develop, and explain your answer.
In Persepolis Marjane Satrapi makes use of light and dark imagery in her panels in order to add meaning to scenes and language.  Investigate one panel (other than one we discussed today in class) and explain how the use of light and dark imagery within the panel helps Satrapi to express to the reader a larger idea within that panel or within the larger text.
As you write this response, please make sure that you cite your panel so that I can refer to the text as I read your response.  Identify the row, frame, and page number so that I know I'm looking at the right thing.  Also, if you have any additional questions please jot those down and bring them to class on Tuesday.

ESL English III

Over the weekend you should prepare for your exam on Tuesday.  Remember that you'll have grammar, questions on Number the Stars, The Boy in the Striped Pajamas and you'll have some multiple choice questions.  Study and review so that you are prepared for this examination.

13 comments:

Tristan Mayers said...

Tristan Mayers 2B

On page 41 Marji shows us the Shah/King's effigy being burned. Though i believe that there is a bigger meaning to this picture because early in class we had established on page 27 that he is the king of "darkness". So Now we have the king of darkness being burned up. Though the way Marji draws it, it almost seems as if it is still dark even though he is going into a pit of flames or "hell". So now we see that he is pretty much the devil who is getting kicked out of the society back to the underworld. Also the streaks made by the ink make it look as if it covers the Shah perfectly and that is whey the picture has a slight grin on it. Now the happy devil goes were it needs to.

Makenzie Elam said...

On Page 15, Row 2 & Frame 2 we are able to see a larger contrast of the light and dark imagery. The light is represented through the spirits of the victims killed in the massacre. The light is also represented through the little fire since. The darkness is represented through the faces on the victims and the Exit. The use of light and dark imagery within the panel causes you to focus on the faces of the victims. You can see the pain they went through on their face. You can also see that when they ran to the door they weren't going to make it out alive because you would have since the light coming in from outside. The use of light and dark imagery helps the reader realize the darkness located in the Shah's Heart/Soul. It also helps the reader realize there is more kindness in the demonstrators & victims hearts.

Makenzie Elam, 2B

Benjamin Kelly said...

In Persepolis we see use of black and white to give meaning to things. On page four, row two, panel one we see a man speaking. This man is declaring that bilingual schools have to be closed down, which puts Marjane in a school separated from her friends. An interesting thing to note about this man is the coloring of his face, more specifically his beard. His beard is solid black, covering his mouth so that all you see is black. She used this coloring here to express her feelings about what this man is saying. You can infer that she is not happy in her new school (this can be seen on page one and four, by her facial expression and her saying that she was not with her friends), which would lead her to believe that what this man said was a bad thing. So, she is using the black coloring of the man’s beard to express her belief that the is speaking bad things.

Jordan Perry said...
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Jordan Perry said...

On page 39 row 2 frame 3 I can see the imagery of light and dark. The dark is represented in the background which shows the negative attitude of Marjis mom in the scene. After she slaps Marji and Mehri you can see a Black Hand mark on their faces. The Black Hand mark represents the pain of the smack and how the negative attitude of Marjis mom rubs off on Marji and Mehri. The use of light and dark imagery helped me to understand the bad attitude and mood of the scene. The all black background and the little bit of white left on Marji and Mehris faces also helped me see the use of light and dark imagery.

Rachel Sauls said...

On page 30, row 2, frame 1, Marji depicts her fear that her father was dead. She was concerned with him leaving and his late return frightened her, causing her to think the worst. Marji is sitting at the table with her head down, which is drawn lightly. Around her everything is dark except for some lines and the head of her father and God. This darkness shows the reader that Marji is trapped in bad, dark thoughts. This also shows the reader Marji's feelings about death.

Mylan Marhoul said...
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Mylan Marhoul said...

On page fifteen, Satrapi depicts the burning of the Rex Cinema. The background of the panel is black, using white lines to illustrate chairs and the exit. The main body of the panel is composed of the flames and the souls of the dead, rising from the flames. The flames and souls are done in a similar art style, making them appear to be one thing. I feel, that in a way, this likens all death to a form of combustion, consuming the fuel of the body for a brilliant emmission of the soul.

Kennady Jones said...

On page twenty four, row two, panel one there is an example of using colors to show meaning. In the panel Marjane's mother is shown in a panel by herself with a black background. Easily you could notice that because Marijane's mother is by herself in the frame, it shows her feeling of sadness/loneliness. Looking deeper into the color of the frame you can tell that the mother's childhood was dark, just like the panel. The mother is remembering the time in her life when she was very poor and had little or no belongings. By making the mother the only character in the frame and by coloring the frame black, you can tell that Majijane's mother still has those bad memories and the feeling of no belongings. The color black usually carries a negative connotation, representing the bad memories. The fact that Marijane's mother had no belongings is represented by the fact that the mother is the sole character shown in the panel.

Jessica Suarez said...

On page 4, row 2 frame 1, 2, and 3, and row 3 frame 1 Marji is telling the audience the changes that was made such as the requirement of the veils and the separation of genders in school. On this page, each frame that has Shah in it(the ruler) has a black background. Marji does this contrast of light and dark to show that Shah is the bad guy by the darkness she surrounds Shah's illustration in. This helps the audience understand that Shah is not a good ruler because his character is drawn to look unfriendly and mean and also the additional darkness that surrounds him.

Alexthesuperfish said...

Alex Bird 2B

On page 5, row 1, Satrapi shows the conflicting views of those who believe in the veil, and those who believe in freedom. Although Marji says she is ambivalent about the issue, an underlying message can be seen in this frame. Satrapi chooses to represent this conflict with only women. This is because wearing veils applies to only women, like Marji herself. We can see hidden theme in the color Satrapi chooses to use in the clothes of these women. The women in support of the veil are in black, while the women in support of freedom are in white. This shows that the traditionalists have a negative connotation and the demonstrators are seen as doing the right thing. Another way Satrapi enforces this message is by drawing the women in veils with their eyes closed. This shows that they are not seeing for themselves, but being led by others. The protesters, on the other hand, have their eyes wide open, to show that they are thinking for themselves.

Georgia G said...

On page 29, row 2, Marjane illustrates her father's participation in the rebellion through photography. Several of her father's photos are spread out, representing small but frightening moments in the rebellion, and he stands next to them with his camera held at his face, prepared to capture more. Marjane uses the darkness of the photos to convey the darkness and weight of their content. And while the photos are used to communicate the scariness of the time, I think Marjane's father is drawn a lighter color to show that Marjane considers him to be separate from the rebellion. At this point in the story she is very young and is only beginning to understand the gravity of the movement taking place around her and her father is still part of her world, which has yet to merge with the reality of the rebellion.

Rachel Geoffrion said...

Rachel Geoffrion 2B 11/25/13

On page eight, row one and panel two, Marji is held by god (a white figure) while surrounded by a dark black background. This panel delves into Strapati’s feelings towards god and towards her religion. The color black is dark and depressing, relating to Marji’s feelings about her life situation. She is surrounded by this dark presence, but by coloring god white, we see that she has found a positive way to get away from this darkness: through religion. In this panel, she looks worried as she is encased in god’s arms and looks into his face. She is looking worried because she is looking for assurance. You can tell that god is comforting her because Strapati’s depiction of god (as bright and surrounding) is protecting her by her/his very presence from the rest of Marji’s shadowy fears. The contrast of god’s light and the darkness surrounding this scene show the greater importance of religion in Strapati’s life at this time.